A Ticket To Spain Part 1: The Spanish Omelette

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Well after this weekend’s Paella extravaganza, I’ve got Spanish grub under my skin. After a couple of glasses of Sangria and a large Margarita, I felt positively holidayed and boy would I LOVE to be on holiday somewhere sunny right now.  It would surely be selfish not to share a few ‘sitting on a patio in a beach-front café on the med’ recipes with you. I’ll definitely share the Paella recipe with you next week but I thought for today we could ease ourselves over to the med with a lunchtime classic – The Spanish Omelette.

You can eat it hot or cold, take it on a picnic, take it to the beach, wap it on a buffet, serve it up with a nice fresh salad for lunch with a friend or make a big one and feed the family on a shoestring. The Spanish Omelette is a GREAT wee pal to have up your sleeve and you’ve probably got all you need to make it in the cupboards without even having to venture to the shops. Always a bonus. This recipe is for the classic – you can funk yours up with whatever wee extras you fancy!

You will need (to make a wee one for 1-2 people):
A handful of new/baby potatoes
1 small onion (traditionally white though I’ve used a red one – controversial)
3 eggs (more if you want to make a bigger one)
salt and pepper
olive oil

Your ticket to Spain:

    

        

Slice your potatoes fairly thinly and dice your onion.
Heat a large glug of olive oil in a frying pan. If you’re making a small one, use a small non-stick pan.
Add your potatoes and onion to the pan, toss around in the oil and then cover with a lid and leave to fry/sweat on a low heat for a good 10 minutes, turning them every so often.
Whisk your eggs in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper.
When the potatoes and onions are cooked through and golden, add them to the bowl with the egg and mix well. Heat another swirl of oil in the pan and add the eggy mixture to the pan. Cover with the lid again on the lowest heat and leave to cook for 10-15 minutes.
When the top is cooked and the bottom is nice and solid, flip the omlette onto the other side. Now, this can be tricky depending on the size. You might get away with using a spatula or two, or alternatively you can cover the pan with a plate, flip the whole thing out onto it by turning the pan upside down, and then slide it back into the pan. Nifty.
Leave for another 5 mins on a low heat, until the egg has cooked through and it is golden on both sides.
Scoff right away or leave to cool, cling film it, and pop it in the fridge for a munch moment later on! Ole!